This fall, Linn County Trails Association is kicking off a campaign to raise money for specific trail projects we feel can be fast-tracked in the next 12 months. This year’s Capital Campaign will raise funds to accelerate the development of two trails: The Lindale Trail and the Hwy. 100 Trail.

 

“We Make Trails Happen!”


Will you help us meet our $175k goal?


The projects

HWY. 100 TRAIL, PHASE A — $100,000

The Lindale Trail in Cedar Rapids, including the current Grant Wood Trail, will become a major east-west route in the greater Cedar Rapids Metro area extending east out of Marion to Martelle and beyond in Jones County, and west in Cedar Rapids to the north/south Cedar Valley Nature Trail (CVNT) . Both Cedar Rapids and Marion have agreed to rename the Lindale Trail to the Grant Wood Trail in the near future in order to unify and simplify understanding of the trail network. This document, however, will continue to refer to Lindale and Grant Wood Trails as separate trails. A map of the entire Grant Wood Trail, including the Lindale Trail Extension, Phase 2, segment (red), is shown in the attached Figure 1.

The current Lindale Trail goes from C Ave NE in Cedar Rapids to the Boyson Trail in Marion. Marion has funded trail projects to extend the Lindale Trail on to the current Grant Wood Trail at the Hwy 13 trail underpass. This includes a segment of the CEMAR Trail and a trail along 6th Ave through uptown Marion extending the trail to Hwy 13 – all to be known as the Grant Wood Trail.

The Lindale Trail Extension, Phase 1, in Cedar Rapids continues west from C Ave NE and Blairs Ferry Rd along the north side of Blairs Ferry Rd, crossing Blairs Ferry Rd with a trail underpass and continuing down the abandoned railroad right-of-way to Council St NE. Funding for the Lindale Trail Extension, Phase 1, construction and the CEMAR trail construction will be provided with 80% from the Corridor Metropolitan Planning Organization (CMPO), and a 20% match provided by Cedar Rapids and Marion, respectively. Wellmark Foundation grant funding is not being requested for these projects.

The Lindale Trail Extension, Phase 2, will extend west from Council St along the railroad right-of-way to connect to the CVNT near the intersection of Center Point Rd and 51st St NE. Total length of the Phase 2 segment is approximately 3600 ft. There is an active, but little used, railroad siding on 2600 ft. of this segment so the trail would be shared with the railroad under a Rails-With-Trails agreement. Two connections from Lindale Trail to CVNT are planned; one going directly to 51st St and crossing Center Point Rd at the light, and one following the railroad right-of-way under the Center Point Rd viaduct and connecting directly to the CVNT as shown in the attached Figure 2.

The Lindale Trail Extension, Phase 2, construction will be funded 80% by CMPO, with 20% match provided by Cedar Rapids. CMPO funds will be available in FFY22. Trail design must be completed before CMPO funds for construction will be released, so the LCTA has offered to donate the necessary design funds to Cedar Rapids now so that actual construction can begin when CMPO funds become available. This should allow completion of the project at least one year earlier. Estimated cost for Phase 2 construction is $1,190,000. Estimated design cost is $75,000.

For the Lindale Trail Extension, Phase 2, design project, the project’s principal personnel consist of the LCTA’s Board of Directors and the City of Cedar Rapids. Both entities have worked on similar projects to extend the trail system within Cedar Rapids. City employees Ron Griffith and Brandon Whyte have been primary points of contact, and both are members of the LCTA’s Advisory Board. We have worked cooperatively with the City of Cedar Rapids for many years to plan trails, acquire needed right-of–way and develop strategies to fund projects. Our goal is to formally present a check for $75,000 to the City of Cedar Rapids by the summer or fall of 2018. Execution of the trail design, planning and construction will then be managed by the City of Cedar Rapids.

There is currently no east/west recreational trail between Cedar Rapids and Marion, and no major east/west trail which connects with the Cedar Valley Nature Trail. Once the Lindale Trail (to become known as the Grant Wood Trail) is completed, the hard surfaced Grant Wood Trail will run from the Cedar Valley Nature Trail, eastward through Cedar Rapids and through Marion, beyond the Highway 13 underpass to Waldo’s Rock Park. Beyond the park the trail will continue as crushed limestone for an additional 3.5 miles. All citizens of Cedar Rapids, Marion and the metropolitan area will be served by the Grant Wood Trail.


LINDALE TRAIL EXTENSION, PHASE 2 — $75,000The Highway 100 Trail is visualized as a route eventually circling beyond the current western edge of Cedar Rapids, generally following Highway 100, crossing the Cedar River downstream from the highway bridge and connecting to Covington Rd and beyond. The Phase 1 route starts from the bike lanes along 42nd St NE at the entrance to Xavier High School, proceeds north along Preserve Lane, turns westward passing over railroad tracks, and ending at the Cedar River near the old bridge pilings from an abandoned railroad bridge. See Figure 3 attached. Linn County Supervisors and Linn County Conservation Board have committed to providing funding for construction of Highway 100 Trail, Phase 1, and are working toward completing the project with a 1,050 foot long bridge across the Cedar River and a trail connecting Covington Rd and beyond.

The Linn County Conservation Board has been awarded 80% of an estimated cost of $1,207,500 from the CMPO for Hwy 100 Trail, Phase 1 construction, and engineering services for the bridge. Linn County will provide the 20% match. Trail design must be completed before CMPO funds for construction will be released, so LCTA has offered to donate the necessary design funds to Linn County now so that actual construction can begin when CMPO funds become available. This should allow completion of the Phase 1 project at least one year earlier. Estimated design cost is $100,000.

For Phase 1 of the Highway 100 Trail project, the project’s principal personnel consist of the Linn County Trails Association Board of Directors and the Linn County Conservation Department (LCCD). Both entities have worked on similar capital projects to extend the trail system within Linn County. Dennis Goemaat, Director of the LCCD, has been the primary point of contact and is a member of LCTA’s Advisory Board. We have worked cooperatively with LCCD for many years to plan future trails, acquire needed right-of-way and develop strategies to fund projects. Our goal is to formally present a check for $100,000 to the Linn County Board of Supervisors by the summer or fall of 2018. Execution of the trail design, planning and construction process will then be managed by Linn County staff.

The Highway 100 Trail, when completed, will serve the entire metropolitan area, but particularly those residents of the northwest side of Cedar Rapids and communities to the west of Cedar Rapids. The design of Phase 1 is the first step in this exciting trail addition.


Why seek private funding?

It’s no question that trails are a great asset across numerous demographics. Bicyclists, runners, walkers, skateboarders — and many more users — make the most of our regional trails network for commuting, exercise, and recreation.

LCTA works closely with local jurisdictions (cities in Linn County and government organizations like the Corridor MPO and the Linn County Conservation Board) to plan, prioritize, and fund the construction of new and improvement of existing trails.

We’re a 100% volunteer-based, non-profit organization, so a substantial amount of financial contributions to LCTA go directly toward trail development. And those funds have truly catalyzed the development and growth of our trails system.

Take a look at some of the ways donations to LCTA have been put to use this year »

Donations can give no-go projects the green light, and speed up trail completion — sometimes by years. LCTA strategically prioritizes trails by providing government organizations required funding toward completing a safe, well-connected trails network.

As city and county budgets tighten, your donations have become even more critical. A donation to LCTA can become the important, required public match funds (for federal- and state-supported projects) and help accelerate a variety of other trails initiatives.

The progress being made with our trail system would not be possible without the kindness of people like you, donating to LCTA and trails. Your monetary support ensures these — and future — projects are successful, and completed soon.

With combined support from citizens like you and local businesses, LCTA can continue to focus energy on building trails throughout Linn County. Large or small, any donation makes a difference in going the extra mile for the people of Linn County.

We extend a huge, “THANK YOU!” to those who have provided support in the past, present, and future.

We look forward to seeing how your partnership can advance our efforts!