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For more information, contact:
John Wauer
Board Member
Linn County Trails Association
[email protected]

August 22, 2011

Linn County Trails Association Presents $96,250 to Linn County Conservation Board

 

Linn County, Iowa – Today, Linn County Trails Association presented the Linn County Conservation Board a donation of $96,250 to complete the funding necessary to pave the Cedar Valley Nature Trail from County Home Road to Lafayette. 

 

In 2009, Linn County was awarded funding from Iowa Department of Transportation Enhancement fund to pave the Cedar Valley Nature Trail from County Home Road to Lafayette.  The project involves the reconstruction and surfac­ing of approximately 3.5 miles. Work will include re-establishment of drain­age, clearing and grubbing, grading, placement of rock base material, surfacing, seeding with native grasses and wildflowers, and planting of trees and shrubs. In 2010, Linn County Conservation Board received notification of another financial award to continue to the project to Schultz Road, another 2.5 miles of paving. The total cost of the project is approximately $2 million.

 

The Conservation Board approached Linn County Trails Association (LCTA) about a public/private partnership to fundraise the remaining $96,000 to complete the project.  LCTA accepted the proposal because of the wide-spread benefits for trails users.  For example, with a paved surface: the trail can be used as an additional four months of the year; there is increased accessibility for all wheeled activities, including wheelchairs, strollers, and rollerblades; and less maintenance costs for Linn County.  Data from LCTA shows that trail usage increases when trails are paved. 

 

LCTA President John Wauer, who presented the check, explained that building trails takes many partners and is not an easy task.  “It is the role of Linn County Trails Association to be a catalyst for the development and growth of a system of connected, multi-use trails through Linn County and Eastern Iowa.  However, the development of trails takes partnerships.  The partnership between Linn County, LCTA and all the financial contributors is why the announcement today is so exciting.”   Donations for project have come from 227 foundations, companies and individuals. This is a demonstration of the wide and strong support for trails in Linn County. 

 

Bidding for the project is expected to begin in November, with construction starting in 2012. The estimated completion for the project is fall of 2012, depending on weather.

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The Bike Lane

LINN COUNTY MAYORS BIKE RIDE ON LABOR DAY  

The annual Linn County Mayors’ Bike Ride will be on Monday morning September 5, 2011. Linn County Trails Association and the Bicycle Advisory Committee are hosting the ride which will start and end at Ellis Park. It’s free and open to the public. Helmets are required.

Registration starts at 9:00 am in the parking lot near Ellis Blvd and Ellis Lane NW. Ride starts at 10:00 am. 2.5 or 8 mile route. Last year approximately 400 cyclists participated.

Live music from KantiRocks will follow in Ellis Park 10:45 am – 12:45 pm. www.kantirocks.com

Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Proceeds will be donated to Linn County Trails Association. www.linncountytrails.org

 KIRKWOOD COMMUNITY COLLEGE FALL CLASSES IN CEDAR RAPIDS

Let’s Run – Train For Your First 5K

Community Training & Response Center

Even if you have never run a step, you can build up to a 5K in eight weeks. This class will help with answering all your running questions and will encourage and motivate you. Topics from proper shoes and clothing to what to expect on race day. Show up ready to workout and have fun. Walkers are also welcome.

http://kirkwood.augusoft.net/index.cfm?method=ClassInfo.ClassInformation&int_class_id=18976&int_category_id=7&int_sub_category_id=40

Indoor Cycling

Gold Pointe Fitness Club

High energy and intensity cycling class that will burn tons of calories and start your day off right. This class is for all levels and will allow you to go at your own pace.

http://kirkwood.augusoft.net/index.cfm?method=ClassInfo.ClassInformation&int_class_id=18883&int_category_id=7&int_sub_category_id=40

Splash! Water Aerobics

New Life Fitness World West

Enjoy a great cardiovascular workout designed to burn calories, trim and tone your body, and still be easy on your joints. It’s a great workout for all levels of fitness with emphasis for those who need or enjoy the benefits of the environment of a pool. This workout can be modified for all fitness levels.

http://kirkwood.augusoft.net/index.cfm?method=ClassInfo.ClassInformation&int_class_id=18836#

NEW LINN COUNTY TRAIL MAPS AT BIKE DAY AT THE FARMERS MARKET AUG 6 

Bike Day at the Farmers Market is on August 6, 7:30 am – Noon at Greene Square Park. Linn Area Mountain Bike Association, Linn County Trails Association, Bicycle Advisory Committee and Bike Ambassadors will provide bike parking from 7:30 am – Noon.

Cyclists using the bicycle parking or stopping by with their bike will receive choice of beverage coupon from Parlor City, Jerseys, Prime Time, and Sammy’s, or a coupon for a free ice cream cone from Parlor City Ice Cream, while quantities last.

Stop by and visit with Linn County Trails Association about the Linn County Mayors Bike Ride. Recently updated Linn County trail maps will be available and they will have LCTA tshirts for sale. www.linncountytrails.org

The Bicycle Advisory Committee will have copies of the “Iowa Goes By Bicycle Guide” provided by the Iowa Bicycle Coalition. It includes information on the benefits of cycling, types of bikes, clearing for takeoff, rules of the road, selecting the best route, commuting, equipment, gear, apparel, bike etiquette, basic maintenance and repair.

Linn Area Mountain Bike Association recently constructed new singletrack trails at Squaw Creek Park in Marion. Beverly Park in Cedar Rapids has 5 miles of singletrack with many intersecting trails and loops for all skill levels, and optional natural and man-made obstacles alongside main trails. LAMBAonline.org.

    CLUBS AND ADVOCACY ORGANIZATIONS

 Bicyclists of Iowa City (BIC) www.bicyclistofiowacity.org

 Bikeiowa   www.bikeiowa.com

 Cedar Rapids BMX  www.CedarRapidsBMX.com

 Cedar Valley Running Association (CVRA)  www.CVRA.net 

 Cedar Valley Association for Soft Trails www.cvast.org

 East Iowa Ski Club (EISC)  www.EastIowaSkiClub.com

 Hawkeye Bicycle Association (HBA) www.HawkeyeBike.org

 Iowa Bicycle Coalition  www.iowabicyclecoalition.org

 Iowa Bicycle Racing Association  www.Bikeiowa.org

 Iowa City Cycling Club (ICCC)   www.iowacitycyclingclub.com

 Iowa Coalition of Off-Road Riders (ICORR) www.ICORRmtb.org

 League of American Bicyclists  www.bikeleague.org

 Kennedy Mt. Biking Club (Chain Gang)  www.Kenn.cr.d12.ia.us

 Linn Area Cyclers Bike Club  www.lacofcr.com www.lacofcr.org

 Linn Area Mountain Bike Assoc. (LAMBA) www.LAMBAonline.org

 Linn County Trails Association (LCTA)  

 www.LinnCountyTrails.org

 Marion-Cedar Rapids Road Hogs Bike Club 

 http://northtownebikes.com/for/roadhogs

 Midwest Xtreme Triathlon Club www.MWXTRI.com

 North Liberty / Coralville Running and Bicycle Club (CRABS)

 www.meetup.com/North-Liberty-Coralville-Running-and-

 Bicycling-Club

 Sticks in the Water Paddlers [email protected]

 Think Bicycles  www.thinkbicycles.org

 University of Iowa Cycling Club (UICC)  www.iowacycling.org

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For Immediate Release

Contacts:
Dennis Mihalsky
The Rosen Group
646.695.7042
[email protected]

Doug Ruchefsky
The Rosen Group
646.695.7050
[email protected]

Kiplinger’s Names 10 Best Value Cities of 2011Omaha, Charlotte and Nashville take top spots

Washington, DC (July 25, 2011)—Kiplinger’s Personal Finance has named its top ten cities that provide the best value—with value defined as low living costs, strong economies and great amenities. This year’s picks are profiled in the September issue of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine, and online at www.kiplinger.com/links/bestcities with additional interactive features. To identify the winners, Kiplinger’s teamed up with Kevin Stolarick, research director at the Martin Prosperity Institute – a think tank that studies economic prosperity. “We searched beyond traditional economic measures and included quality of life and the ability to tap people’s creative potential,” says Stolarick, who this year provided data to evaluate U.S. cities for livability and greatest overall value. “People today are choosing locations based as much on amenities and atmosphere as they are on financial opportunities.” Kiplinger’s staff members visited each of the top ten cities to help determine the final rankings. These cities have several common themes. Public-private partnerships have been vital not just to creating great public spaces, but also to helping nurture business environments that attract employers and bring high-paying jobs. For example, Omaha’s Midtown Crossing has been one key to that city’s downtown renovation, and the completion of the Clinton Presidential Library in 2004 became the keystone of a renaissance in Little Rock, Ark. . Low living costs, especially when it comes to housing, make these cities ideal for people looking for value, or business owners seeking great places to open new operations. And our top ten also put a premium on livability, including lots of free amenities, music and arts venues, and outdoor activities. “It’s this trifecta of vitality, livability and low costs that we know our readers are interested in,” says Kiplinger’s senior editor Robert Frick. “And because all these cities have a high percentage of residents in the creative class—basically creative, educated people—which closely mirrors our readership, we think our 2011 Best Value Cities are communities where they’ll feel right at home.”

Kiplinger’s Best Cities 2011 package offers these special features online at www.kiplinger.com/links/bestcities:

· Narrated walking-tour slide shows with Kiplinger’s editors and writers

· A Which City is Best for You? calculator to help readers determine which city best matches their goals and tastes

· A spreadsheet that lets readers see where their own city ranks in different key categories

· A Facebook “Readers’ Choice” poll where audiences can vote for their favorite city among Kiplinger’s top 10 picks or add their own favorite city to the mix

Kiplinger’s Best Cities of 2011:

1. Omaha, NE—Omaha? Omaha natives are sick and tired of the question mark. Given the work this vibrant prairie city has done revitalizing itself over the past ten years, its cost of living and its remarkably low unemployment rate, Omaha takes the top spot without question.

2. Charlotte, NC—Home to Bank of America, several Fortune 500 companies including Lowes and steel company Nucor, and blossoming small business and energy sectors, Charlotte’s economy is both well-diversified and growing. The city is also making a push to become greener by attempting to reduce energy use downtown 20% by 2016. Top-notch schools, a flourishing culinary scene, as well as low taxes and utility rates make Charlotte a top-tier city.

3. Nashville, TN—Sure, Nashville is home to the Grand Ole Opry and the highest concentration of record labels, recording studios, music publishers and distributors in the nation. But the Music City also means business. The area is making a strong comeback from the recession and is expected to add more than 151,000 jobs by 2019 – mostly in the education, health services, and manufacturing fields. Amenities such as a free bike-share program for residents and no state income tax help make Nashville particularly attractive.

4. Colorado Springs, CO—Colorado Springs is proof that smart people flock to a diverse economy in a truly great outdoor setting wrapped in a happy vibe. The city is home to five military bases that employ 10% of the workforce, and more than a dozen colleges. To keep employment numbers rising, the city woos companies with tax incentives and its highly-educated workforce. Colorado Springs also has affordable rents and living costs.

5. Knoxville, TN—Knoxville has managed to avoid the sharpest impact of the Great Recession thanks to such economic drivers as the Tennessee Valley Authority (the nation’s largest public utility), the University of Tennessee and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The city also offers an abundance of free, eclectic, and family-friendly entertainment options, along with a revitalized downtown area. Low taxes, low energy/utility rates, affordable housing and free downtown public transportation also make Knoxville a cheap and desirable place to live.

6. Lexington, KY—Steeped in history, tinged with bourbon and surrounded by the horse farms that define its identity, Lexington has worked hard to protect its bluegrass pastures, brick-and-limestone buildings and small-town feel while cultivating a burgeoning downtown and a forward-looking economy. Affordable housing and utilities also help to make this northern-Kentucky city a top place to live.

7. Little Rock, AR—Revving Little Rock’s job market is a diverse economy, including a 500-person Caterpillar factory in North Little Rock, the headquarters of IT company Acxiom, and world-class medical centers. The completion of the Clinton Presidential Library in 2004 sparked a downtown renaissance. Additionally, a trendy arts scene and a collection of fine dining and local music establishments endear this great city to its residents.

8. Wichita, KS—Prices are typical of a small prairie town, but Wichita comes with surprising big-city amenities. Many workers head to one of the city’s several aviation manufacturing and research companies, including Spirit AeroSystems and Cessna Aircraft. A well-rounded selection of restaurants, theaters and other cultural venues blend in cosmopolitan flavor. Prices for homes and entertainment are both extremely affordable compared to the national average.

9. Cedar Rapids, IA—From grains to planes, a diverse economy attracts a high-tech workforce and cushions the city from downturns. The nearby University of Iowa provides Cedar Rapids residents with access to Big Ten sports, and the city itself is laced with parks, bike trails, and various entertainment options. The city has recovered nicely from the 2008 Cedar River flood, and housing costs and property taxes remain extremely affordable.

10. Cincinnati, OH—After taking a big recession hit, the city is flexing its economic muscle and revamping its downtown. With ten Fortune 500 companies, including Kroger, Macy’s and Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati’s diverse economy is making a strong comeback from the recession. The cost of living is about 7% below the national average. Cincinnati offers all the big-city amenities you’d expect, plus some you wouldn’t, including a park within one mile of every resident.

More on Ranking Methodology

Kiplinger’s included data from Martin Prosperity Institute research director Kevin Stolarick on population growth, unemployment rate, income growth, cost of living and cost of housing, among other factors, to get an initial list of cities. Also included is a “creative class” measure, which stems from Stolarick’s work with Richard Florida, academic director of the Martin Institute and author of The Rise of the Creative Class. This measure reflects the number of creative-class workers—including educators, writers, and scientists—living in the area. Further research involved traveling to each of the ten cities to interview business and community leaders and residents. The rankings factor in both the data and the results of Kiplinger’s reporting.

About Kiplinger’s Personal Finance

For nine decades, the Kiplinger organization has led the way in personal finance and business forecasting. Founded in 1920 by W.M. Kiplinger, the company developed one of the nation’s first successful newsletters in modern times. The Kiplinger Letter, launched in 1923, remains the longest continuously published newsletter in the United States. In 1947, Kiplinger created Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, the nation’s first personal finance magazine. Located in the heart of our nation’s capital, the Kiplinger editors remain dedicated to delivering sound, unbiased advice for your family and your business in clear, concise language. Become a fan of Kiplinger on Facebook or Kiplinger.com and follow Kiplinger updates on Twitter.

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Oak Hickory News

The Fall 2011 Oak Hickory Newsletter is now available.  Please click on the link below to explore the latest Linn County Conservation Department news and happenings:

http://library.constantcontact.com/download/get/file/1101646565693-13/fall+2011+%282%29.pdf

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Do you live, work or travel along 1st Avenue East between 27th Street and 40th Street? We want your input on the future development of this road. Help us identify corridor problem areas, neighborhood concerns and improvement options.

•Online Survey: Click here to complete the survey about this road
•Attend a Meeting: Attend the informational meeting and visioning session Thursday, July 28 ◦6:00-9:00 p.m. St. Matthew’s Church, Kern Hall, 2310 1st Avenue NE

This stretch of 1st Avenue East is a commercial center and main corridor between downtown and residential areas of Cedar Rapids. This important transportation corridor is nearing traffic capacity during some periods of the day, which has had an impact on traffic safety and access to local businesses. The 1st Avenue East corridor between 27th Street and 40th Street will be rebuilt as a “Complete Street Improvement,” which means a street design that provides for safe, comfortable and convenient travel for all users, including motorists, bicycles, pedestrians, and transit riders. The new design may include additional turning lanes, driveway consolidations, medians, sidewalk improvements, CEMAR trail crossing, utility upgrades, accessible transit, trees, and other landscaping enhancements. For more information, please contact the project team at [email protected]

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City Seeking Input from Residents about 1st Avenue East

CEDAR RAPIDS, IA – July 13, 2011 – The City of Cedar Rapids has launched a community wide survey to kick-off a road improvement study of 1st Avenue East from 27th Street to 40th Street. The survey is available on the City’s website at www.Cedar-Rapids.org.

The City encourages all residents that live, work or travel along this corridor to provide input regarding the future development of this road to help us identify corridor problem areas, neighborhood concerns and improvement options. The City is collecting input in two ways: 

  • Online survey available at www.Cedar-Rapids.org
  • Public Information Meeting on July 28, from 6:00-9:00 p.m. at St. Matthew’s Church Kern Hall, 2310 1st Avenue NE

This stretch of 1st Avenue East is a commercial center and main corridor between downtown and residential areas of Cedar Rapids. This important transportation corridor is nearing traffic capacity during some periods of the day, which has had an impact on traffic safety and access to local businesses.

The 1st Avenue East corridor between 27th Street and 40th Street will be rebuilt as a “Complete Street Improvement,” which means a street design that provides for safe, comfortable and convenient travel for all users, including motorists, bicycles, pedestrians, and transit riders.

The new design may include additional turning lanes, driveway consolidations, medians, sidewalk improvements, CEMAR trail crossing, utility upgrades, accessible transit, trees, and other landscaping enhancements.

For more information, please contact the project team at [email protected].

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Mark Wyatt
Iowa Bicycle Coalition
***Congress threatens to end ALL dedicated bike/ped funding – contact your Senators and Representative today!***
House Transportation Chairman John Mica announced today that his proposed long-term federal transportation bill will eliminate dedicated funding for biking and walking — including Transportation Enhancements, Safe Routes to School and the Recreation Trails Program — referring to these programs as “not in the national interest.”
Things on the Senate side are not much better. Senator James Inhofe, a lead negotiator in the Senate, declared that one of his top three priorities for the transportation bill is to eliminate “frivolous spending for bike trails.”  Senator Inhofe’s comments mean funding for bicycling and pedestrian programs is at risk of total elimination.
Not Transportation?
Biking and walking make up 12 percent of all trips in the US – even as funding for biking and walking projects only accounts for 1.5% of the federal transportation budget. That’s more than 4 billion bicycle trips and 40 billion walking trips a year — including trips to work, school, shopping and for recreation and tourism.
Frivolous?
Bicycling and walking programs build bikeways, walkways and other facilities for millions of Americans, improving access and saving lives.
The Facts
Biking and walking are important forms of transportation (and recreation and tourism). Funding for bicycle and pedestrian improvements is a very efficient use of federal transportation dollars.  Portland, Oregon built a city-wide bike network for the cost of one mile of highway.
These projects also create jobs and build local economies.  Building bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure creates 46% more jobs than building road-only projects per million dollars spent.
Finally, eliminating 1.5% of transportation spending would have a very small impact on the federal budget, but instead decrease transportation options for American families in a time of rising gas prices and an uncertain economy.
Help Protect Transportation Enhancements, Safe Routes to School and Recreational Trails. Contact your representatives in Congress, and tell them to reach out to Senators Inhofe, Boxer, and Congressman Mica to continue funding for biking and walking.
Why Now?
Both the House and Senate long-term transportation bill are being written right now.  We still have a chance of influencing the outcomes.  Let’s make sure that funding for biking and walking programs doesn’t disappear for many years to come.
Click on the link below and contact your Senators and Representatives TODAY and tell them that continued dedicated funding for bicycling and walking is a must.  It is a critical part of a safe, accessible and effective transportation system.
Use this link now, provided by our friends at the Safe Routes to School Partnership. This is the same alert that is being used by all of our friends at America Bikes:
http://org2.democracyinaction.org/o/7093/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=7483

for your help – it will take just 5-10 minutes and make an important difference!
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RAGBRAI XXXIX CORALVILLE JULY 29
RAGBRAI will enter Coralville from the West on IWV Rd, turning north on Camp Cardinal Blvd, which becomes 22nd Avenue, then east on 9th Street, south on 18th Avenue, east on 8th Street, where riders will enter the Coralville RAGBRAI campus at S.T. Morrison Park. The park will be the hub of activities with campgrounds, aquatic center, entertainment, beverage garden, and food vendors. 38 Special will perform in the Town Center Parking Ramp at 8 pm. Tickets are $10, free for those wearing the official RAGBRAI wristband. www.38special.com

Volunteers are needed for a variety of areas, including beverage garden, information center, parking, sanitation, set-up, and entertainment. Register to volunteer at: www.coralvilleRAGBRAI.com
The Trekwomen Bike Demo Tour provides women of all abilities the opportunity to test ride a Trek WSD (Women’s Specific Design) bike, and try the latest women’s products from Gary Fisher and Bontranger. Tech reps educate riders on products and proper bicycle fit. www.fitforwomentour.com Check out the latest WSD bikes and gear at trekbikes.com/women.   
The Davenport to Coralville RAGBRAI Training Ride will be on Saturday, July 9, sponsored by SCHEELS. The 65 mile training ride is a fundraiser for the Coralville and Davenport RAGBRAI Committees. The route is the reverse of the July 30 RAGBRAI route. It will begin at 8:00 am at the dip site in Davenport and end at SCHEELS at Coral Ridge Mall in Coralville, traveling through Walcott, Durant, Wilton, Moscow, Rochester, Springdale, West Branch, and Iowa City.
The $25 registration fee includes the choice of Coralville or Davenport official RAGBRAI T-Shirt, pancake breakfast, snacks along the route, emergency bike repair/SAG Wagon Service (if needed), and route end refreshments at SCHEELS.  There will be a shorter route that joins up in West Branch for the last 15 miles. http://www.coralville.org/index.aspx?NID=466

IOWA CITY BIKE LIBRARY
The Iowa City Bike Library is located at 408 E. College Street. Bikes are available for checkout on Saturdays 10 am – 1 pm. Supply of bikes is limited, so arrive early. You can check out a bike for 6 months with a deposit which varies depending on the type and condition of the bike. They accept donations of bikes in good or repairable condition. For a small fee, you can use their tools, books, and equipment to tune up or repair your bike from Noon – 1pm on Saturdays. There are volunteer opportunities for skilled bike mechanics and other tasks such as bike checkout, data entry, helping patrons, bike stripping & salvage, bike pick up, cleaning & organizing and recycling. www.bikelibrary.org

SHARED USE LANES ON EAST MAIN STREET IN ROBINS

At the May 16th Robins City Council meeting, the council unanimously voted to install shared-lane pavement markings on East Main Street. East Main Street begins in Robins at N. Troy Road and runs southeast to C Avenue NE.

TOUCH THE EARTH OUTDOOR RECREATION AND EDUCATION PROGRAM
The Touch the Earth Outdoor Recreation and Education program provides opportunities for members of the University of Iowa and surrounding communities to learn about a variety of outdoor activities. Some of the past classes have included bicycle touring, mountain biking, canoeing, marathon training, hiking, trail running, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing.
http://recserv.uiowa.edu/Apps/Programs/TouchTheEarth.aspx

SPLASH PADS AT HAYES PARK AND CEDAR VALLEY PARK
Cedar Rapids Parks and Recreation Department recently opened new splash pads at Hayes Park, 1924 D Street SW, and Cedar Valley Park, 2250 Blakely Boulevard SE. Spray features are activated when you run your hand across the sensor on the fire hydrant. Water is turned on at 10:00 am each day, and turned off at 8:00 pm. Other splash pads are located at Cleveland Park, Daniels Park, Hidder Park, Jacolyn Park, Noelridge Park (near Harding School on Golf Street), Redmond Park and Time Check Park. For more information, contact Park Operations at (319) 286-5760.

JAZZ UNDER THE STARS CONCERTS IN AUGUST
In August, Jazz 88.3 KCCK presents free Jazz Under the Stars concerts on Thursday evenings 7:00 pm at Noelridge Park, bike parking area provided to the left of the stage. Food and refreshments available for purchase. You’re also invited to bring lawn chairs, blankets, and your own picnic to the park. In the event of rain, concerts will be held indoors at Parlor City Pub and Eatery 1125 3rd St. SE. www.kcck.org

August 4 – Ariel Pocock
arielpocock.com

August 11 – Funk Daddies
www.funkdaddies.com

August 18 – Dennis McPartland and The Jazz Underground

August 25 – Bob Dorr and The Blue Band
www.theblueband.com

 FARMERS MARKET GREENE SQUARE PARK
 Bike parking provided 7:30 am – Noon on 1st and 3rd Saturdays:
 July 2nd and 16th
 August 6th Bike Day LAMBA Skills Demonstration
 August 20th
 September 3rd, September 17th Linn County Safe Kids Day
www.downtowncr.org

 HALL BICYCLE COMPANY
www.hallbicycle.com

SUMMER HOURS:
Mon. & Thur. 8:30 am – 8:30 pm
Tue, Wed and Friday 8:30 am – 5:30 pm
Saturday 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Sunday Closed

NORTHTOWNE CYCLING & FITNESS
www.northtownebikes.com

SUMMER HOURS:
Mon. & Thur. 9:00 am – 8:30 pm
Tue, Wed, Friday 9:00 am – 6:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am – 3:00 pm
Sunday Closed

CLUBS AND ADVOCACY ORGANIZATIONS
 Bicyclists of Iowa City (BIC) www.bicyclistofiowacity.org
 Bikeiowa   www.bikeiowa.com
 Cedar Rapids BMX  www.CedarRapidsBMX.com
 Cedar Valley Running Association (CVRA)  www.CVRA.net 
 Cedar Valley Association for Soft Trails www.cvast.org
 East Iowa Ski Club (EISC)  www.EastIowaSkiClub.com
 Hawkeye Bicycle Association (HBA) www.HawkeyeBike.org
 Iowa Bicycle Coalition  www.iowabicyclecoalition.org
 Iowa Bicycle Racing Association  www.Bikeiowa.org
 Iowa City Cycling Club (ICCC)   www.iowacitycyclingclub.com
 Iowa Coalition of Off-Road Riders (ICORR) www.ICORRmtb.org
 League of American Bicyclists  www.bikeleague.org
 Kennedy Mt. Biking Club (Chain Gang)  www.Kenn.cr.d12.ia.us
 Linn Area Cyclers Bike Club  www.lacofcr.com www.lacofcr.org
 Linn Area Mountain Bike Assoc. (LAMBA) www.LAMBAonline.org
 Linn County Trails Association (LCTA) 
 www.LinnCountyTrails.org
 Marion-Cedar Rapids Road Hogs Bike Club 
 http://northtownebikes.com/for/roadhogs
 Midwest Xtreme Triathlon Club www.MWXTRI.com
 North Liberty / Coralville Running and Bicycle Club (CRABS)
 www.meetup.com/North-Liberty-Coralville-Running-and
 Bicycling-Club
 Sticks in the Water Paddlers [email protected]
 Think Bicycles  www.thinkbicycles.org
 University of Iowa Cycling Club (UICC)  www.iowacycling.org

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Cedar Valley Nature Trail news

Progress is being  made in opening the sections of the Cedar Valley Nature Trail that was closed by the floods of 2008.  See this link to the Iowa Bicycle Coalilition for information on the bridges over the Cedar at Evansdale and McFarland Park and the trail between Brandon and La Porte City:  http://www.iowabicyclecoalition.org/node/43

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The Winter 2011 newsletter features a “Trail User’s Guide to 2011”, East Bridge Post Bridge improvements, Collins Road Trail construction, Hoover Nature Trail update and cross-country ski trails in Linn County.

lcta-2011-01 (1260 downloads)
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